4º ESO (English)





3rd EVALUATION
RUGBY

--UNIT 1--

How to play Rugby??




Download the notes of this theme here or HERE


Hiking and Orienteering



Using the compass in interaction with a map:
video

Or:













2nd EVALUATION
ACROSPORT





--UNIT 4--

Acrosport Notes 4th ESO 




KICKBALL
--UNIT 3--

Kickball 4ºESO


KORFBALL
--UNIT 2--

Introduction to KorfballNow, you can learn  more:



HANDBALL
--UNIT 1--
2.Class Overview & Introduction:

The purpose of this unit is to familiarize students with the world-wide sport of Team Handball. This unit will require the use of various skills that are used in other sports and that have been taught in the Physical Education courses taken prior to this one. Students will become familiar with the lay-out and rules of this game, and then get firsthand experience playing the sport in a predominantly modified setting.

Lesson Plan
 
Lesson 1- Introduction - General rules and overview, Team Handball history, visual aids used to set up the unit (videos of actual Team Handball games).
Lesson 2- Ball handling - Introduce ball used, become familiar with how to handle.
Lesson 3- Passing / Throwing - Introduce the proper throwing technique.
Lesson 4- Dribbling - Introduce the proper dribbling technique.
Lesson 5- Passing / Catching / Shooting / Dribbling - Combine the skills learned in previous lessons to introduce the progression of these skills in a normal offensive scenario.
Lesson 6- Passing / Catching / Shooting - Emphasize the importance of eye contact and communication with offensive teammates. "Polish up" skills in these areas after learning proper progression of these.
Lesson 7- Dribbling / Screening / Defense - Emphasize one on one defensive skills. Students play defense with no or little help.
Lesson 8- Team Defense - Focus on the proper rotation of a defense and how to stop fast breaks.
Lesson 9- Goal Keeping / Shots on Goal - Emphasize proper body positioning when goal keeping and strategic shot placement when shooting.
Lesson 10- Modified Team Handball Games - Apply skills through a variety of lead-up games.


2.1 History

The Early Days
Handball is believed to be one of humanity's oldest games. Some historians speculate that it predates soccer, since humans have always been better at manipulating objects with their hands than with their feet.
There's strong evidence that the ancient Greeks and Romans played games that could be considered precursors to modern handball. The Greeks' game was called urania. As depicted in Homer's Odyssey, it employed a ball made out of purple wool. Later, the Romans played harpaston, in which competitors threw a ball over a line. There is also evidence that games similar to handball were played in Greenland, Egypt and medieval Europe. One of these sports, played in Germany, was called fangballspiel, which translates to "catch ball game."

The Modern Era
Handball as it is played today began in northern Europe in the late 19th century, when it emerged as the successor to such regionally popular games as raffball and Königsbergerball. Holger Nielsen of Denmark - who actually medaled in fencing and shooting at the first modern Olympic Games in 1896 - and German physical education teacher Max Heiser are credited with shaping the basic rules that would come to govern the sport. The International Amateur Handball Federation was established in 1928; it was replaced in 1946 by the International Handball Federation, which continues today as the sport's world governing body.
Handball underwent a number of refinements during its formative years. The most significant was a move indoors. In its first modern incarnation, called field handball, teams of 11 played on turf fields. Because of the game's popularity in snowy Scandinavia, a scaled-down indoor version featuring seven-member teams, soon arose and eclipsed field handball. This is the version of the sport that is played at the Olympics today.

Olympic Origins
Despite its connection to Greek antiquity, handball didn't make its Olympic debut until 1936. As host of the Berlin Games, Germany was allowed to add a demonstration sport to the program and chose field handball. The Germans outscored their first four opponents 86-13 on their way to the championship game. They went on to defeat Austria, 10-6, to win the gold medal.
The Germans' romp did little to stir handball fever in the wider Olympic community. The sport, primarily a European phenomenon at the time, was not included in 1948 when the summer games resumed after a 12-year interruption. In fact, handball's absence lasted until 1972, when the men's indoor game returned as part of the Munich Olympics - this time as an official event.
The revived sport displayed more staying power than before. After the 1972 Summer Olympics, in which Yugoslavia stunned the defending world champion, Romania, to win the gold medal, the International Olympic Committee allowed it to remain a part of the games.
Women's handball was added to the roster of Olympic sports at the 1976 Montreal Games, with the Soviet Union winning the first gold medal. Medals in men's and women's team handball have been awarded in every Summer Olympics ever since. 


2.2 Basic Rules
You can see a video with the basic rules :
The Playing Court: The court measures 20 meters by 40 meters. The court is larger than a basketball court, but the length may be shortened when space is limited. The goal area line, or 6-meter line, is the most important line. No one except the goalie is allowed to stand in the goal area. The goal opening is 2 meters by 3 meters. Players may jump into the area if the ball is released before landing in the area.
Number of Players: There are seven players on each team (six court players and one goalie). A maximum of 12 players may dress and participate in a game for each team. Substitutes may enter the game at any time, through own substitution area, as long as the player they are replacing has left the court.
Uniform of the Players: Player numbers are 1 to 20. Uniform shirts and shorts are the same color. The goalkeeper must wear a different color shirt from teammates and opponents. No jewelry is allowed.
Referees: There are two referees, a court referee and a goal line referee. Referees have complete authority: their decisions are final. The referees are assisted by a timer and a scorer.
Duration of the Game: For players 18 years and over, the game consists of 2, 30-minute halves with 10-minute half-time. For tournament and youth games 2, 15-minute or 2, 20- minute halves. This is running time except for injury, or one team time-out per half. The teams swap benches at half-time. The game ends in a tie unless the game demands a winner. (Tournament rules dictate that a winner must be determined.) Overtime consists of 2, 5-minute periods).
Passive Play: It is illegal to keep the ball in a team's possession without making a recognizable attempt to attack and to try to score. In other words, a team cannot stall (free-throw awarded to the other team).
Throw-Off: A throw-off is taken by the team that wins the coin toss and chooses to start the game with the ball. Each team must be in its own half of the court with the defense 3 meters away from the ball. Following the whistle, the ball is passed from center court to a teammate and the game begins. Throw-off is repeated after every goal is scored and after half-time.
Scoring: A goal is scored when the entire ball crosses the goal line inside the goal. A goal may be scored from any throw (free-throw, throw-in, throw-off, goal-throw).
Playing the Ball
A player is allowed . . . -To run with the ball for 3 steps -To hold the ball for 3 seconds -Unlimited dribble with 3 steps allowed before and after dribbling (no double-dribble).
A player is NOT allowed . . .
  • To endanger an opponent with the ball.
  • To pull, hit or punch the ball out of the hands of an opponent.
  • To contact the ball below the knee.
  • To dive on the floor for a rolling or stationary ball.
Defending the Opponent: A player is allowed to use the torso of the body to obstruct an opponent with or without the ball. However, using the outstretched arms or legs to obstruct, push, hold, trip or hit is NOT allowed. The attacking player is not allowed to charge into a defensive player.
Throw-In: A throw-in is awarded when ball goes out of bounds on the sideline or when the ball is last touched by a defensive player (excluding the goalie) and goes out of bounds over the endline. The throw-in is taken from the spot where the ball crossed the sideline or, if it crossed the endline, from the nearest corner. The thrower must place one foot on the sideline to execute the throw. All opposing players must stay 3 meters away from the ball. 

Referee Throw: A referee throw is awarded when . . . The ball touches anything above the court, after a simultaneous infringement of the rules, after simultaneous possession of the ball.
The Referee throws the ball vertically between two opposing players. The jumping players may grab the ball or tap it to a teammate. All other players must be 3 meters away from the throw. The referee throw is always taken at center court.
Free-Throw: For a minor foul or violation, a free-throw is awarded to the opponent at the exact spot it took place. If the foul or violation occurs between the goal area line and the 9-meter line, the throw is taken from the nearest post outside the 9-meter line. The thrower must keep one foot in contact with the floor, then pass or shoot.
7-Meter Throw: The 7-meter throw is awarded when . . .
  • A foul destroys a clear chance to score
  • The goalie carries the ball back into his or her own goal area
  • A court player intentionally plays the ball to his or her own goalie in the goal area and the goalie touches the ball
  • A defensive player enters his or her goal area to gain an advantage over an attacking player in possession of the ball.
All players must be outside the free-throw line when the throw is taken. The player taking the throw has 3 seconds to shoot after referee's whistle. Any player may take the 7-meter throw.
Goal-Throw: A goal-throw is awarded when . . . The ball rebounds off the goalkeeper over the endline. The ball is thrown over the endline by the attacking team.
The goalie takes the throw inside the goal area and is not restricted by the 3-step/3-second rule.
Progressive Punishments: Pertain to fouls that require more punishment than just a free-throw. "Actions" directed mainly at the opponent and not the ball (such as reaching around, holding, pushing, hitting, tripping and jumping into an opponent) are to be punished progressively.
Warnings (yellow card): The referee gives only one warning to a player for rule violations and a total of three to a team. Exceeding these limits results in 2-minute suspensions thereafter. Warnings are not required prior to giving out a 2-minute suspension. 2-minute suspensions awarded for . . . -Serious or repeated rules violations -Unsportsmanlike conduct -Illegal substitution. -The suspended player's team plays short for 2 minutes.
Disqualification and Exclusion (red card): A disqualification is the equivalent of three, 2-minute suspensions. A disqualified player must leave court and bench, but the team can replace player after the 2-minute suspension expires. An exclusion is given for assault. The excluded player's team continues short one player for the rest of the game.


Video with the basic rules: 

Handball final match, France vs. Iceland. Last 5 minutes of the game and highlights:

 

1st EVALUATION
FITNESS II--UNIT 1--

 1.2. How to Calculate and Use Your Training Heart Rate                                                  
 Activity-1a)
video Learn how to calculate resting heart rate  with tips from a doctor in this free health video. 
 
Video Transcript
We talked about needing to figure out what your intensity of aerobic exercise will be. For beginners, you can just use the simple brisk walking technique; where you are still able to carry on a conversation, but you're having a brisk breathing sensation. Another way to do it is to actually calculate your target heart rate. To do that, first you need to calculate what your resting heart rate is, so you need to get a watch with a second hand on it, or that calculates digitally, and you're going to isolate your radial artery, which is here, and place your index finger on it. Don't use your thumb, because there's a pulse in your thumb, and that will confuse the sensation. You're going to place your finger on there, and count the number of beats you feel in a ten second interval. For instance; if I feel ten, I'm going to multiply that by six, so I would get 60 beats in a minute. It is important to take it when you are at rest, so first thing in the morning would be best, but that would be your resting heart rate. We're going to use that to figure out what your target heart rate is.

1.4. Stomach Crunches Instructions
Activity-1e)VIDEO: 15-Minute Abs Workout
video 
Ratings for Men, Based on Age


Rating
< 35 years
35-44 years
> 45 years
Excellent
60
50
40
Good
45
40
25
Marginal
30
25
15
Needs Work
15
10
5

Ratings for Women, Based on Age
Rating
< 35 years
35-44 years
> 45 years
Excellent
50
40
30
Good
40
25
15
Marginal
25
15
10
Needs Work
10
6
4

1.8. Multi-stage Shuttle Run
Activity-1h)

Males


very poor
poor
fair
average
good
very good
excellent
12 - 13 yrs
< 3/3
3/4 - 5/1
5/2 - 6/4
6/5 - 7/5
7/6 - 8/8
8/9 - 10/9
> 10/9
14 - 15 yrs
< 4/7
4/7 - 6/1
6/2 - 7/4
7/5 - 8/9
8/10 - 9/8
9/9 - 12/2
> 12/2
16 - 17 yrs
< 5/1
5/1 - 6/8
6/9 - 8/2
8/3 - 9/9
9/10 - 11/3
11/4 - 13/7
> 13/7
18 - 25 yrs
< 5/2
5/2 - 7/1
7/2 - 8/5
8/6 - 10/1
10/2 - 11/5
11/6 - 13/10
> 13/10
26 - 35 yrs
< 5/2
5/2 - 6/5
6/6 - 7/9
7/10 - 8/9
8/10 - 10/6
10/7 - 12/9
>12/9
36 - 45 yrs
< 3/8
3/8 - 5/3
5/4 - 6/4
6/5 - 7/7
7/8 - 8/9
8/10 - 11/3
> 11/3
46 - 55 yrs
< 3/6
3/6 - 4/6
4/7 - 5/5
5/6 - 6/6
6/7 - 7/7
7/8 - 9/5
> 9/5
56 - 65 yrs
< 2/7
2/7 - 3/6
3/7 - 4/8
4/9 - 5/6
5/7 - 6/8
6/9 - 8/4
> 8/4
> 65 yrs
< 2/2
2/2 - 2/5
2/6 - 3/7
3/8 - 4/8
4/9 - 6/1
6/2 - 7/2
> 7/2

Females


very poor
poor
fair
average
good
very good
excellent
12 - 13 yrs
< 2/6
2/6- 3/5
3/6- 5/1
5/2 - 6/1
6/2 - 7/4
7/5 - 9/3
> 9/3
14 - 15 yrs
< 3/3
3/4 - 5/2
5/3 - 6/4
6/5 - 7/5
7/6 - 8/7
8/8 - 10/7
> 10/7
16 - 17 yrs
< 4/2
4/2 - 5/6
5/7 - 7/1
7/2 - 8/4
8/5 - 9/7
9/8 - 11/10
> 11/11
18 - 25 yrs
< 4/5
4/5 - 5/7
5/8 - 7/2
7/3 - 8/6
8/7 - 10/1
10/2 - 12/9
> 12/9
26 - 35 yrs
< 3/8
3/8 - 5/2
5/3 - 6/5
6/6 - 7/7
7/8 - 9/4
9/5 - 11/5
> 11/5
36 - 45 yrs
< 2/7
2/7- 3/7
3/8- 5/3
5/4 - 6/2
6/3 - 7/4
7/5 - 9/5
> 9/5
46 - 55 yrs
< 2/5
2/5 - 3/5
3/6 - 4/4
4/5 - 5/3
5/4 - 6/2
6/3 - 8/1
> 8/1
56 - 65 yrs
< 2/2
2/2 - 2/6
2/7 - 3/5
3/6 - 4/4
4/5 - 5/6
5/7 - 7/2
> 7/2
> 65 yrs
< 1/5
1/5 - 2/1
2/2 - 2/6
2/7 - 3/4
3/5 - 4/3
4/4 - 5/7
> 5/7

1.9. Flexibility and Stretching (Modified Sit and Reach Test)
 Activity-1i
The following table is data from the American College of Sports Medicine (1995) for performance in the sit and reach test:


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